Rural history to be on display at tractor show


By Dean Palmer - For The Pilot



Joe Allen of Ararat will again be at this year’s Rock House Tractor Show, demonstrating the almost forgotten skills and techniques of blacksmithing.


File photo

PINNACLE — The rich agricultural history of rural northwestern North Carolina will be highlighted this Saturday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Rock House Ruritan Building, as the Rock House Ruritan Club hosts its 17th annual Antique Tractor, Auto, Engines and Farm Equipment Show.

Originally organized as a tractor show, the event has grown over the years to include an assortment of classic vehicles, engines and other farm equipment and antiques related to the community’s agricultural culture.

But while becoming more diverse, the show has kept tractors as a featured part of its displays. Among this year’s highlights will be a tractor parade and free hayride scheduled for 9:30 a.m. The parade is open to all tractors on hand and anyone may take part in the hayride, with all children to be accompanied by an adult.

Other featured highlights will include the return of a pair of demonstrations of once popular but increasingly obscure skills. Joe Allen of Ararat will be on hand to demonstrate blacksmithing techniques. A second demonstration will feature Pinnacle resident Hal Rosenquist sawing wood and grinding corn with his Fairbanks Morse engine.

Expected attractions will include an “extremely rare” Minneapolis Moline horse-drawn plow estimated to be 100- to 150-years-old, owned by Jimmy Moore of Rural Hall. Tractors on hand will range from a 1942 Model V Farmall to a 2015 Farmall 75C. Among the rare a classic vehicles expected will be a 1952 BF Avery Model V tractor.

Displayed alongside tractors and cars will be antique lawn mowers and hit-and-miss engines. And more than 75 varied pieces of horse-drawn equipment will be displayed.

“That’s the most we’ve ever had on display,” noted club representative Don Bennett, who collects and will be displaying many of the horse drawn items.

“All of this will be things that were used years ago by the people in this community to make a living,” Bennett said. “It’s a part of history, especially for this area, and there’ll be a lot of things that people may not have seen before.”

The demonstrations will be part of a full day of food, fellowship and entertainment planned for the annual fundraiser. Tents and shaded areas will be available throughout the day as will concessions and horse shoe pitching.

Admission for the day will be free, with funds to be raised primarily by tickets sold for the popular cow bingo game. Cow bingo is scheduled to get underway at 2 p.m. with $1,000 to be given away. Game spaces will be available until that time at a cost of $10 per space.

According to Bennett, proceeds will be used by the club to help residents with need in the club’s local community and the surrounding area as well as local seniors with medical or heating needs. The club also supplies two Surry Community College scholarships each year to area high school graduates and supports the West Stokes High School Special Olympics program.

“This is something good for the whole family,” Bennett explained. “They’ll be able to see tools and equipment and demonstrations of the way things used to be.”

The Rock House Ruritan Building is located on N.C. 268 East, five miles outside of Pilot Mountain. For additional information on the day, Bennett may be contacted at 336-351-2893 or Todd Gordon can be reached at 336-413-5896.

“I’m excited,” Bennett said. “There’s always something new to learn and there’ll be things here that I haven’t seen before. It should be a good show.”

Dean Palmer may be reached at 336-351-4131 or dean.palmer8@gmail.com.

Joe Allen of Ararat will again be at this year’s Rock House Tractor Show, demonstrating the almost forgotten skills and techniques of blacksmithing.
https://www.pilotmountainnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_SAM_2881.jpgJoe Allen of Ararat will again be at this year’s Rock House Tractor Show, demonstrating the almost forgotten skills and techniques of blacksmithing. File photo

By Dean Palmer

For The Pilot

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