Pilot Creek exploration


By Alia Boyd - aboyd@civitasmedia.com



Park Ranger Jesse Anderson chasing after a “critter” in Pilot Creek.


Park Ranger Jesse Anderson, Kelly Kiker and Julian Dolley walk through Pilot Creek in search of Eastern Hellbender salamanders.


Park Ranger Jesse Anderson looks under rocks in search of macroinvertebrates.


Jesse Anderson, park ranger for Pilot Mountain State Park, lead a Pilot Creek exploration last Thursday for those interested in learning more about the “critters,” as Anderson put it, that inhabit the creek.

The specific section of the creek that the exploration focused on is located near 300 Boyd Nelson Road in Pinnacle.

Anderson noted that the land that borders the creek is actually a new addition to the state park, having been added in December of 2015.

Pilot Creek runs down from the mountain and is generally clear, Anderson explained.

Despite the fact that the creek is predominately clear, Anderson noted that different species adapt to different types of pollution, adding that the number one pollutant in the state is sediment.

With the abundance of farm land that borders creeks, Anderson noted that a way to protect against sediment pollution is through a riparian zone, which is a section of grown up vegetation along the creek bank that acts as a filter to pollutants.

One of the creek “critters” that Anderson cited as being impacted by sediment pollution is the Eastern Hellbender salamander, which is primarily found in the western part of the state.

Anderson instructed that when handling salamanders, members of the exploration group needed to make sure that their hands were wet and cold due to the fact that salamanders are cold blooded creatures.

While searching for macroinvertebrates, Anderson instructed participants to look under rocks and to carefully comb over the bottom of the rocks, because macroinvertebrates tend to cling onto the surfaces of the rocks.

Following the turning of rocks, Anderson stressed the importance of ensuring that the rocks are returned to the exact same location and position that they were before looking under them, citing the fact that the rocks serve as a home for creek life.

Anderson explained that different areas of the creek are home to different species, noting that faster ripples of the creek are more likely home to macroinvertebrates.

Other “critters” that were discovered during the exploration include cactus flies, which Anderson explained only come out during certain times of the year and have a tendency to be explosive breeders.

Cactus flies, as Anderson noted, are used as jewelry in some countries.

Crawfish were a staple throughout the exploration and following Anderson’s advisement, explorers always held the fish from the backside so that they wouldn’t be bitten.

Anderson explained that crawfish, like humans, shed their skin. Whenever a member of the exploration wanted to hang onto one of the crawfish for further examination, there was a separate container due to the fact that the crawfish would eat some of the smaller creatures.

Two of the members of the exploration group, Kelly Kiker and Julian Dooley, drove to Pilot Mountain from Lexington for the event.

Kiker is a high school environmental science teacher and noted some of the overlaps between the exploration and what she teaches her students in the classroom.

Anderson said that he hopes the creek exploration events will gain popularity and participatione.

Upcoming events for Pilot Mountain State Park include:

– Frog Watch! on July 28 at 8:30 p.m.

-Pilot Creek Exploration on July 30 at 2 p.m.

-Jomeokee Hike on Sept. 4 at 10 a.m.

-Intro to Map/Compass Campground on Sept. 13 at 10 a.m.

-Fire Ecology Hike on Sept.ember 15 at 6 p.m.

Park Ranger Jesse Anderson chasing after a “critter” in Pilot Creek.
http://www.pilotmountainnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_Park3.jpgPark Ranger Jesse Anderson chasing after a “critter” in Pilot Creek.

Park Ranger Jesse Anderson, Kelly Kiker and Julian Dolley walk through Pilot Creek in search of Eastern Hellbender salamanders.
http://www.pilotmountainnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_Park1.jpgPark Ranger Jesse Anderson, Kelly Kiker and Julian Dolley walk through Pilot Creek in search of Eastern Hellbender salamanders.

Park Ranger Jesse Anderson looks under rocks in search of macroinvertebrates.
http://www.pilotmountainnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_Park2.jpgPark Ranger Jesse Anderson looks under rocks in search of macroinvertebrates.

By Alia Boyd

aboyd@civitasmedia.com

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