Music lovers come out for bluegrass festival


By Dean Palmer - For The Pilot



The Mount Airy-based band, Rich In Tradition, play before a large, appreciative Saturday night crowd.


Dean Palmer | The Pilot

Ray Honeycutt and Tommy Nichols enjoy the food, fellowship and bluegrass music at the Nunn Brothers Bluegrass Festival.


Dean Palmer | The Pilot

As the Saturday evening sun begins to set, the music attracts dancers of all ages to the dance floor.


Dean Palmer | The Pilot

WESTFIELD — The festive atmosphere at last weekend’s 17th annual Nunn Brothers Bluegrass Festival was reminiscent of generations past, when bluegrass was king and local communities often came together for music and fellowship.

Friday and Saturday evenings saw a steady stream of vehicles make their way to the Nunn Brothers Music Park, located on what was once a family tobacco field in the Woodville community where twin brothers Alden and Arnold Nunn grew up and continue to live today.

The park’s setting fits the music perfectly — rural and rustic with a small stream running alongside.

Drawn by a line-up including several popular local bands and featuring long-time recording artists, The Lost and Found Band, bluegrass fans and their families came from throughout the region and beyond.

“We had a good turnout on Friday evening,” Arnold Nunn said, pausing from making his rounds to greet new attendees and chat with old friends. “And Saturday was really good. Everybody enjoyed the music and it was a good weekend.”

Among those attending for the first time were Clay and Nancy Reid of Tobaccoville, who made the drive after receiving an invitation from Nancy’s cousin, Frankie Clarke of Pilot Mountain.

Clay Reid especially enjoyed the music, noting that he preferred the older bluegrass tunes to current favorites. Reid had grown up in Union Grove, home of its own legendary bluegrass festival. His father was a fiddler and Reid had grown to love the music at an early age.

With a smile, Nancy Reid described herself as more given to easy listening, but noted that she was still finding plenty to enjoy. “I like it all,” she said with a quick glance around the park.

Nancy’s cousin, Frankie Clarke, sat nearby with her husband, Gordon Clarke. The couple had attended previous bluegrass festivals both at the site and at other locales in the region. While Gordon Clarke enjoyed the music from the stage, his wife took in the landscape and the people around her. “It’s such a nice setting for this,” she noted.

Dean Palmer may be reached at 336-351-4131 or dean.palmer8@gmail.com.

The Mount Airy-based band, Rich In Tradition, play before a large, appreciative Saturday night crowd.
http://www.pilotmountainnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_DSC03852.jpgThe Mount Airy-based band, Rich In Tradition, play before a large, appreciative Saturday night crowd. Dean Palmer | The Pilot

Ray Honeycutt and Tommy Nichols enjoy the food, fellowship and bluegrass music at the Nunn Brothers Bluegrass Festival.
http://www.pilotmountainnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_DSC03867.jpgRay Honeycutt and Tommy Nichols enjoy the food, fellowship and bluegrass music at the Nunn Brothers Bluegrass Festival. Dean Palmer | The Pilot

As the Saturday evening sun begins to set, the music attracts dancers of all ages to the dance floor.
http://www.pilotmountainnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_DSC03869.jpgAs the Saturday evening sun begins to set, the music attracts dancers of all ages to the dance floor. Dean Palmer | The Pilot

By Dean Palmer

For The Pilot

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