Westfield Memorial Day service to honor the fallen


By Dean Palmer - Special to the News



The World War II Memorial has long been a focal point of the Westfield Memorial Day service. The monument honors by name the military service of seven former Westfield School students and one former school employee with a simple epitaph, “They died that we might live.”


Westfield residents and those from surrounding areas are invited to join in the community’s annual Memorial Day Service this Sunday afternoon, honoring both veterans who have served and sacrificed for their country and those who are currently serving.

The 22nd annual service will begin at 12:30 p.m. around the World War II Memorial, adjacent to the Westfield Ruritan Community Building on the grounds of the old Westfield School on Westfield Road (NC Highway 89.) The site is located across from the Westfield Post Office.

In following the event’s long tradition, patriotism will be a central theme of the day with small flags surrounding the lawn. An honor and color guard composed of veterans from Pilot Mountain VFW Post 9436 will raise the large flag overlooking the site and will provide a 21-gun salute and the playing of Taps.

A centerpiece of the ceremony has always been the World War II Memorial, containing the names of area veterans who have sacrificed their lives in service. Other veterans are also honored and those in attendance are recognized for their service to country. At least one veteran will have the opportunity to share thoughts on the day’s significance.

Each year a wreath is placed at the memorial as part of the ceremony. This year, the honor of placing that wreath will go to Matthew Hutchens, one of several local residents who have a relative remembered on the monument.

The annual ceremony is hosted as a community service by the Westfield Ruritan Club. Ruritans, some of whom are also veterans, will also take part in the ceremony. Club member Frank Meyer will direct the service while Doris Jessup will be among those speaking.

“For us,” Westfield Ruritan Club President Greg Jessup explained, “this is an important day. We believe it means something to the people who have served and are serving, and we’re glad to be able to host this service.”

“This is not just something for those of us who are getting older,” he continued, “but it’s for everybody. It’s important to have something like this for our young people. And it’s good for everybody to see and remember how their family members, the neighbors around them and the people who have lived here before them have served their country.”

The World War II Memorial has long been a focal point of the Westfield Memorial Day service. The monument honors by name the military service of seven former Westfield School students and one former school employee with a simple epitaph, “They died that we might live.”
http://www.pilotmountainnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_WW-II-monument.jpgThe World War II Memorial has long been a focal point of the Westfield Memorial Day service. The monument honors by name the military service of seven former Westfield School students and one former school employee with a simple epitaph, “They died that we might live.”

By Dean Palmer

Special to the News

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